2013 Ginza Festival at Midwest Buddhist Temple

Images from the Midwest Buddhist Temple's Ginza Festival

 

August 9, 10 and 11, 2013

Midwest Buddhist Temple’s annual celebration of Japanese crafts and culture, the Ginza Holiday is an annual three-day event held the second weekend of August. The Ginza Holiday showcases the cultural heritage of those who founded the temple and allows members to share this with the public through demonstrations of traditional Japanese art forms, crafts, cuisine and performances.

  • One highlight of this festival is The Waza, a group of “living treasure” craftsmen who visit from Japan in order to demonstrate their skills and share their creations.
  • Dharma talks are presented regularly during Ginza by a resident minister,and tours of the temple are held.
  • A raffle, which benefits temple programs and operation, is held each year;

tickets are available from MBT members, at the temple office, or at the event.

Midwest Buddhist Temple held its first Ginza Holiday in 1956 at its former site several blocks east of the current temple. The festival took its name from The Ginza, a busy and colorful shopping center and the most famous district in Tokyo.

But 300 years ago, the area was famous for duck hunting, as it was originally a vast swampland. Tokugawa Ieyasu ordered the reclamation of the area in 1603 and gave the work to several feudal lords, thus the lots were named for them – such as Owari-cho, Yamashiro-cho, Kaga-cho and other streets.

The name Ginza dates to 1612 when Ginza, or the official silver mint, was opened there. Later, in 1873, the construction of two-story brick houses and brick sidewalks gave birth to The Ginza we know in Tokyo today.

Midwest Buddhist Temple
435 West Menomonee Street

 

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Chicago Aikido Club is non-profit organization dedicated to the free and creative exploration of Aikido in all its aspects – martial, physical and spiritual.
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